Outreach and Engagement Events

CU Boulder offers a wide range of events focused on a variety of topics for all audiences. These include public presentations and performances, workshops, lectures, family activities and exhibits.

To add information to this calendar listing go to https://calendar.colorado.edu/ and choose “Outreach and Engagement” under the interest category section.

April 2018

Calling all transfer students to join us for conversation and reflection on the past year at CU Boulder. Celebrate as the semester draws to an end! We'll provide ice cream, toppings and lawn games. You bring the conversation, friends and family!

View on site | Email this event

A M P L I F Y: Stories of University-Community Collaborations is a production of CU Engage, the Center for Community-Based Learning and Research at CU Boulder, in partnership with community radio KGNU. The show aims to amplify the voices of students and community partners who are working together to generate new knowledge and actions to address wicked public challenges.

View on site | Email this event

At CU Boulder, undergraduates serve as PA coaches alongside K-12 students in Boulder and Lafayette. Together students participate in a year-long cycle of inquiry and action around school and community based social justice issues. All participants gain insight on community leadership, the foundations of social change, and the power of relationships.

View on site | Email this event

Join us for a free customized tour of our galleries featuring women artists whose artwork is currently on view! One of our student employees researched, created, and will lead this tour which includes artworks by Millie Chen and Agnes Denes.

View on site | Email this event

Come take a late afternoon walk around University of Colorado’s main campus with Dr. Erin Tripp, Curator of Botany and Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology! We will begin with a tour around campus to observe different lichen growth forms, and conclude with a Q&A session with Dr. Tripp back at the museum. PS: No prior experience necessary - lichens are for everyone!

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition Curious Connections in Nature.

View on site | Email this event

Look for us around Boulder, Broomfield and beyond! If you can’t make it to the museum, the CU Museum of Natural History’s educators will bring hands-on activities, teaching materials and activities to the following locations for all ages to enjoy.

Look for us at the City Nature Challenge Bioblitz Kick-off Event! Learn how to use iNaturalist and help us show the world how biodiverse Boulder County, Colorado is by making as many observations of as many species as possible from April 27-30, 2018!

View on site | Email this event

Under the direction of Prof. David Nesbitt, these interactive shows are presented are hosted by renowned University of Colorado, Boulder professors and provide a perfect start to a fun-filled weekend. The shows are geared toward children and young adults, but all are welcome! Each program lasts about an hour and includes several lively demonstration experiments.

View on site | Email this event

Look for us around Boulder, Broomfield and beyond! If you can’t make it to the museum, the CU Museum of Natural History’s educators will bring hands-on activities, teaching materials and activities to the following locations on Saturday for all ages to enjoy.

Look for us at the Broomfield Public Library as we celebrate learning about books and our watery world!

View on site | Email this event

Join the CU Boulder School of Education for the Graduate Studies Open House.

Explore our programsConnect with current students and faculty ​Take a tour of the beautiful CU Boulder campusLearn about financial aid, admissions, flexible course schedules, and moreRSVP here to receive an event reminder and directions: https://www.colorado.edu/education/academics/graduate-programs/graduate-studies-open-hous

View on site | Email this event

Nowadays, laser light can be generated in pulses whose time duration is as short as a few tens of an attosecond (one quintillionth of a second or a billionth of a billionth of a second). Recent progress and concepts behind the generation of such ultrashort laser pulses and ideas how to use this new technology to make snapshots of electron dynamics in the quantum world will be presented.

Presented by: Professor Andreas Becker

The Department of Physics proudly presents the Saturday Physics Series, lectures geared toward high school students and adults to highlight the exciting research and practical potential of physics.

All lectures are free and open to the public and located in Duane Physical Laboratories, room G1B30. Cookies and lemonade will be available after the lecture and talkback.

View on site | Email this event

May 2018

Later this summer, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft will begin a historic mission to our nearest star, the Sun. By measuring particles, electric fields, and magnetic fields, Parker Solar Probe will strive to answer Big Questions about the sources and variability of the solar wind. Understanding the solar wind is important, in part, because it carries energy and momentum from the Sun to the Earth, profoundly shaping the near-Earth space environment. To carry out its mission, the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft must travel very close to the Sun, reaching a distance of less than 5 million miles from the solar surface. This orbit requires the spacecraft to endure extreme heat, extreme cold, and unprecedented speeds, all with minimal communication with Earth.

Dr. Malaspina will discuss the solar wind and the Big Questions that motivate Parker Solar Probe. He will describe the spacecraft, including its scientific instruments, challenges to its survival, and its orbit. Finally, he will present LASP’s contribution to the FIELDS instrument and report on preparations for this summer’s launch.

View on site | Email this event

CU on Friday is all about bringing the CU community together! CU Boulder students, faculty and staff ... Join us for this new UMC tradition!

This month, check out the new pieces added to the UMC Student Arts Program collection at our annual Art Walk!
Paint a tiny watercolor!
Refreshments will be provided.

View on site | Email this event

In CBR, university researchers collaborate with people directly impacted by an issue to formulate a research project or creative project that examines an issue of public concern. Guided by values of equity and participation, CBR teams draw on varied forms of expertise and collectively decide on goals and methods with the aim of producing public knowledge that builds capacity for the partner organization and/or contributes to social change.

View on site | Email this event

Look for us around Boulder, Broomfield and beyond! If you can’t make it to the museum, the CU Museum of Natural History’s educators will bring hands-on activities, teaching materials and activities to the following locations for all ages to enjoy.

Look for us at the Boulder Farmers Market to learn all about birds!

View on site | Email this event

The CU Museum of Natural History and CU Facilities Management – Outdoor Services will be hosting their annual Spring Color Tree Walk led by Facilities Operations Arborist Vince Aquino, and Alan Nelson, retired Outdoor Services Director. The tour is free and open to the public. While guests experience the beauty of the trees, Mr. Aquino will share the distinctive characteristics, and historical significance of the trees on CU’s campus.

View on site | Email this event

A M P L I F Y: Stories of University-Community Collaborations is a production of CU Engage, the Center for Community-Based Learning and Research at CU Boulder, in partnership with community radio KGNU. The show aims to amplify the voices of students and community partners who are working together to generate new knowledge and actions to address wicked public challenges.

View on site | Email this event

The CU Museum of Natural History and CU Facilities Management – Outdoor Services will be hosting their annual Spring Color Tree Walk led by Facilities Operations Arborist Vince Aquino, and Alan Nelson, retired Outdoor Services Director. The tour is free and open to the public. While guests experience the beauty of the trees, Mr. Aquino will share the distinctive characteristics, and historical significance of the trees on CU’s campus.

View on site | Email this event

June 2018

Join us for a look at the past hundred years of the archives, chat with archivists working with the collections, and learn more about the future of archives.

Together, we are moving toward increased community inclusion, process transparency, and accessibility of all the collections held at CU Boulder! Finger foods and cake will be provided.

View on site | Email this event

Staff Council sponsored Bonfils Blood Drive June 19-20, 2018. Come donate, you're just our type! CU Student Rec Center Ice Overlook Room, 9am to 2:30pm

View on site | Email this event

Staff Council sponsored Bonfils Blood Drive June 19-20, 2018. Come donate, you're just our type! CU Student Rec Center Ice Overlook Room, 9am to 2:30pm

View on site | Email this event

A M P L I F Y: Stories of University-Community Collaborations is a production of CU Engage, the Center for Community-Based Learning and Research at CU Boulder, in partnership with community radio KGNU. The show aims to amplify the voices of students and community partners who are working together to generate new knowledge and actions to address wicked public challenges.

View on site | Email this event

July 2018

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

A M P L I F Y: Stories of University-Community Collaborations is a production of CU Engage, the Center for Community-Based Learning and Research at CU Boulder, in partnership with community radio KGNU. The show aims to amplify the voices of students and community partners who are working together to generate new knowledge and actions to address wicked public challenges.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

August 2018

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

A M P L I F Y: Stories of University-Community Collaborations is a production of CU Engage, the Center for Community-Based Learning and Research at CU Boulder, in partnership with community radio KGNU. The show aims to amplify the voices of students and community partners who are working together to generate new knowledge and actions to address wicked public challenges.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

Discover the organizations that make up our CU Boulder community, and how you might fit in. This festival includes free food, music, giveaways, and the opportunity to engage with hundreds of CU Boulder community members and student organizations.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

September 2018

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event

Documenting Change: Our Climate, the Rockies is the first in a series of exhibitions and programs in 2018/19 presenting the historical scope of documentary strategies shared by artists and scientists in their study of climate. Often their study involves recording change. The exhibition unites historical and contemporary materials to demonstrate connections between artistic production and scientific discovery. Alongside works from the University of Colorado Art Museum's permanent collection, the exhibition will feature documentary photographs from the archives of National Snow and Ice Data Center, and contemporary artworks with a focus on the Front Range Rocky Mountains.

View on site | Email this event

In this series, Daisy Patton uses American postmortem photography as a substratum for her paintings. These photographs are intended to commemorate the deceased and offer solace to those grieving. In the photographs Patton selects, ornate funeral parlor interiors and elaborate trappings—floral arrangements, religious symbols and decorative rugs—overwhelm the presence of a body.

Patton enlarges found black-and-white postmortem photographs taken in the late19th through mid-20th century and lavishly paints over them. Her application of shocking colors and extensive patterning vivifies the photographs. Raised painted surfaces appeal to the sense of touch and felt experience. Vines and floral motifs emanate from and enter into the bodies, suggesting cyclic journeys. Faces, folded hands and other photographic passages untouched by Patton’s brush bring into relief the corpse and personalize our relationship with the dead.

Given the immersive scale of Patton’s tableaux, viewers participate as mourners, both for those who have died and for our own movement toward death. This Is Not Goodbye encourages bereavement rituals and supports a public discourse on how we approach loss in American society.

This exhibition is curated by Sandra Q. Firmin.

View on site | Email this event


View More Events